Teachers favourite Ipad Apps

Here is a handy visual that Educational Technology and Mobile learning created based on iTunes collection ‘Teachers’ Favourites’. They say that you will in it « find a number of key iPad apps popular among teachers and educators.  The apps are arranged into four main categories: apps for communicating with students and parents, apps for creating quizzes and tests, apps for fostering students creativity, and apps for planning lessons.  Two apps that are not in iTunes original collection and which we added to second category are Google Classroom and Edmodo. »

You can download for free in PDF format from here.

teachers-5c-fav_22048659_e2836b0d56b7eca69f43245bb99e39c95eb0e4f5

Link for the article: http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2017/04/teachers-favourite-ipad-apps.html

Web-based language class activities

Abstract

Over the past two decades, a growing number of educational researchers have studied the benefits of using information and communication technologies (ICT). Research on Computer-Assisted Language Learning, mostly foreign language learning, shows that the use of ICT is beneficial to the development of learners’ competences. This paper presents the preliminary results of an ongoing research on this topic. Building on a brief review of the literature and the analysis of lesson plans of Portuguese language teachers, this study argues that ICT are mainly used to support traditional methodological approaches, contrasting with the learner-centred ones encouraged by recent research on the topic.

Full paper at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877042813010537#

21st Century Technology Skills Are a Core Competency for Todays Graduates

Our students need to be comfortable with the information technologies that are inextricably linked to the 21st century skills the work place requires, and

via 21st Century Technology Skills Are a Core Competency for Today’s Graduates.

Evaluating Web Resources

This is a multidisciplinary guide on evaluating research sources, especially resources found on the World Wide Web.

Imagem

Currency: the timeliness of the information

  • When was the information published or posted?
  • Has the information been revised or updated?
  • Is the information current or out-of date for your topic?
  • Are the links functional?

Relevance: the importance of the information for your needs

  • Does the information relate to your topic or answer your question?
  • Who is the intended audience?
  • Is the information at an appropriate level (i.e. not too elementary or advanced for your needs)?
  • Have you looked at a variety of sources before determining this is one you will use?
  • Would you be comfortable using this source for a research paper?

Authority: the source of the information

  • Who is the author/publisher/source/sponsor?
  • Are the author’s credentials or organizational affiliations given?
  • What are the author’s credentials or organizational affiliations given?
  • What are the author’s qualifications to write on the topic?
  • Is there contact information, such as a publisher or e-mail address?
  • Does the URL reveal anything about the author or source?
         examples: .com (commercial), .edu (educational), .gov (U.S. government),
                   .org (nonprofit organization), or .net (network)

Accuracy: the reliability, truthfulness, and correctness of the content, and

  • Where does the information come from?
  • Is the information supported by evidence?
  • Has the information been reviewed or refereed?
  • Can you verify any of the information in another source or from personal knowledge?
  • Does the language or tone seem biased and free of emotion?
  • Are there spelling, grammar, or other typographical errors?

Purpose: the reason the information exists

  • What is the purpose of the information? to inform? teach? sell? entertain? persuade?
  • Do the authors/sponsors make their intentions or purpose clear?
  • Is the information fact? opinion? propaganda?
  • Does the point of view appear objective and impartial?
  • Are there political, ideological, cultural, religious, institutional, or personal biases?

By scoring each category on a scale from 1 to 10 (1 = worst, 10=best possible) you can give each site a grade on a 50 point scale for how high-quality it is!

45 – 50 Excellent | 40 – 44 Good | 35 – 39 Average | 30 – 34 Borderline Acceptable | Below 30 – Unacceptable

Note: the CRAAP test was developed by librarians at CSU Chico. See link on left.

 source: http://libguides.library.ncat.edu/content.php?pid=53820&sid=394505

Citação do dia #1

A propósito do 11 de Setembro:

Observe good faith and justice towards all Nations; cultivate peace and harmony with all.
George Washington (1796)

A maior democracia do mundo teria muito a aprender. As culturas restantes também.

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :